Leadership Links 2/25/2020

LEADERSHIP

5 church leadership lessons I learned from Moses’ father-in-law (Paul Alexander): Moses is actually pretty early in his personal leadership development and along comes Exodus chapter 18, which turns out to be a crucible moment for Moses. It’s one of those moments where Moses’ leadership grows exponentially. Exponential leadership growth, or crucible moments, are usually a result of pain in our lives, and in Exodus 18 Moses is experiencing all kinds of leadership pain. In fact, it was so painful it affected his family so badly that his father-in-law had to step in. Not a great moment for a son-in-law. Read more on the Paul Alexander blog.

A quick character test for Christian leaders (Chuck Lawless): Christian leader, I invite you to take this test as you begin this week. Consider these characteristics of Christian leadership, and then answer the accompanying question for yourself. Read more at ChuckLawless.com.

10 leadership statements that spell trouble (Chuck Lawless): Over the years, I’ve worked with a lot of church leaders in struggling situations. I hear their pain, and I even understand it when I learn about their situations. At the same time, though, I always get concerned when I hear these kinds of things from leaders, as they often suggest that somebody’s about to give up. Read more at ChuckLawless.com.


CHURCH LIFE

7 ways to stop church gossip (Ron Edmondson): Gossip exaggerates every situation. It keeps the one who did wrong loaded with guilt and frustration and from experiencing the fullness of God’s grace. (The Bible talks a great deal about this issue of gossip. Consider these passages: Proverbs 11:13, Proverbs 16:28, Proverbs 20:19, Proverbs 26:20, Romans 1:29, 2 Corinthians 12:20 and 1 Timothy 5:13.) With this in mind, I’m listing 7 suggestions for stopping, or at least slowing, the spread of gossip in the church. Read more at RonEdmondson.com.


SPIRITUAL LIFE

How do I humble myself? (David Mathis): Humility is not something we can achieve. We might consider it quintessentially American to think we could. You can do it. Be proactive. Take the first step. Grab the bull by the horns and be humble. In other words, humble yourself by your own bootstraps. But if we come to the Scriptures with such a mindset, we find ourselves in a different world. Genuine humility, as with true faith, is not self-help or a life hack, but a response to divine initiative and help. Read more at Desiring God.

How to suffer well: Three ways to prepare now (Marshall Segal): We don’t need all the answers when suffering strikes. In fact, we won’t have all the answers. We only need to know a few truly great promises and a few proven paths other faithful sufferers have walked, and crawled, before and beside us. Read more at Desiring God.

23 ways to love people better (Paul Tripp): Genuine, other-focused, Christ-centered love  is willing self-sacrifice for the good of another that does not require reciprocation or that the person being loved is deserving.Today, I want to give you 23 practical applications of that definition that you can implement in your marriage or other relationships. Read more at PaulTripp.com.

Can you repent if you were caught? Three signs of godly sorrow (Chad Ashby): We don’t need all the answers when suffering strikes. In fact, we won’t have all the answers. We only need to know a few truly great promises and a few proven paths other faithful sufferers have walked, and crawled, before and beside us. Read more at Desiring God.


PREACHING

7 tips in preaching the Old Testament (Jason Derouchie): If we’re convinced that Jesus’s only Bible is still important for Christians, how should we think about the intimidating task of preaching from the Old Testament? Here are seven tips for aspiring Old Testament preachers. Read more at The Gospel Coalition.


LEADERSHIP

Assessing elders in a digital age (Justin Schell): The calling of the elder is an honorable one, and the need for churches to identify and install worthy men to this role is as crucial as ever before. This need isn’t new, but the context into which elders are called to serve is. One seismic shift from previous generations is that we’re now considering men who are digital natives—they’ve grown up in the digital age. How should this reality affect the ancient work of calling elders? Read more at The Gospel Coalition.